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U.S. Department of Justice, Office Of Justice Programs, Innovation - Partnerships - Safer Neighborhoods
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Working for Youth Justice and Safety
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Tribal Youth Programs and Services

Overview

Programs and Funding

Research and Evaluation

TTA

Contacts

Resourcesnew

FAQs

OverviewTop  
OJJDP's Tribal Youth Programs and Services helps tribal communities prevent victimization and juvenile delinquency, reduce violent crime, and improve tribal juvenile justice systems.
Programs and FundingTop  
The Department of Justice's Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) combines funding from bureaus/offices within the Office of Justice Programs, the Office on Violence Against Women and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. CTAS includes two primary funding sources from OJJDP for federally recognized tribes that focus on youth. These two grant funding programs are described below and can be applied for via the CTAS application. For more information on CTAS, visit Tribal Justice and Safety: Grants.
  • The Tribal Youth Program (FY99-FY16): Supports the ability of tribal governments to prevent juvenile delinquency and respond to, and care for, justice-involved youth.
  • Tribal Juvenile Healing to Wellness Courts (FY15-FY16): The overall goal is to enhance the capacity of tribal courts to respond to the alcohol and substance use-related issues of youth under the age of 21. This can include the development of a new or enhancements to an existing juvenile healing to wellness court.
In addition to those grants available directly to federally recognized tribes through CTAS, OJJDP has funded demonstration mentoring programs, and research and evaluation programs focused on tribal youth. These include:
  • Tribal Youth Mentoring Program (FY08-FY11): Aims to build the capacity of tribes to develop and strengthen tribal youth mentoring programs.
  • Tribal Juvenile Detention & Reentry Green Demonstration Program (FY09): Supports demonstrative program services with an environmental focus for tribal youth residing within or reentering from tribal juvenile detention centers.
  • Tribal Youth Field Initiated Research & Evaluation (FY09-FY12): Practitioner- and policy-maker oriented research and evaluation studies of effective programs, policies, and strategies for the prevention and intervention of tribal youth delinquency.
  • National Intertribal Youth Summit (FY10-FY12): OJJDP hosted an annual youth leadership conference for American Indian and Alaska Native youth (ages 14-17) that focused on critical issues in tribal communities. Building on the successes of these annual events, OJJDP launched the National Intertribal Youth Leadership Development Initiative (FY13-FY17) to further expand leadership development support to tribal youth through regional and national learning events that strengthen the ability of tribal youth to initiate, contribute to and participate in culturally relevant efforts that reduce risk factors and enhance protective factors in youth, schools, communities and families.
  • Mentoring Opportunities for Youth (FY15-FY16): This solicitation supports non-profit applicant organizations as they strengthen and/or expand their existing mentoring activities. Mentoring activities include direct one-on-one, group, peer, or a combination of these types of mentoring services for at-risk and underserved youth populations. Mentoring promotes positive behaviors, attitudes, and outcomes for youth and reduces risk factors. Applicants under the National Mentoring Programs category must develop and implement a plan to serve American Indian and Alaska Native youth, both on and off reservations.
  • Defending Childhood American Indian/Alaska Native Police Initiative: Supporting Trauma-Informed Juvenile Justice Systems for Tribes (FY16): This solicitation directly addresses several recommendations included in Ending Violence So Children Can Thrive, a report from the Attorney General's Advisory Committee on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence. These recommendations call for tribal alternatives to detention, including use of facilities where children and youth can find safety and easily access services (safe houses); development or revision of tribal juvenile codes to promote trauma-informed, culturally specific and individually tailored care for youth; and wider application of culturally adapted, evidence-based, trauma-informed screening, assessment, and treatment services in tribal juvenile justice and related systems.
Current Funding Opportunities:

Visit the Funding Opportunities page for information on current funding opportunities available through OJJDP.

To subscribe to OJJDP's listserv that sends out messages about funding and other opportunities available, visit the JUVJUST page.
Tribal Youth Program Training and Technical Assistance
Training and Technical AssistanceTop  
Training and technical assistance (TTA) is available through several sources:

The Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center provides federally recognized tribes with assistance through a variety of approaches including consultation through e-mails, telephone calls, and site visits as well as peer-to-peer dialogue and training, including teleconferences and Web-based discussions. Topics addressed include:
  • capacity building
  • culturally based approaches to prevention and intervention
  • program implementation
  • evaluation
  • enhancement of tribal court systems
  • strategic planning
  • sustainability
  • youth issues, including gangs and youth leadership
  • community readiness assessments
  • cultural adaptation to evidence based programs and practices
  • trauma-informed care

The Indian Country Child Trauma Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center provides TTA to OJJDP tribal grantees and all federally recognized tribes to increase tribal communities’ skills and knowledge about programs and strategies, building capacity to develop effective and sustainable programs for reducing juvenile crime and increasing youth potential in tribal communities.

Through the Alaska Native Youth Training and Technical Assistance Project (FY12–FY16), The Resource Basket, a program of the Rural Alaska Community Action Program, Inc., provides TTA to OJJDP tribal grantees in Alaska. The mission of The Resource Basket is to help rural communities support healthy, successful and culturally connected Alaska Native youth.

Training and technical assistance support is also available from CSR Incorporated, which manages the Data Collection and Technical Assistance Tool (DCTAT) for grantees to report performance measurement data. CSR staff also provide training and support regarding the selection and use of performance measures and navigating DCTAT. Further information on how to access assistance is available on the DCTAT web page.

ContactsTop  
OJJDP Contact(s)

Sharie Cantelon
Program Manager
Programmatic Contact
202-616-3658
sharie.cantelon@usdoj.gov

Tenzing Lahdon
Program Manager
Programmatic Contact
202-514-8045
tenzing.lahdon@usdoj.gov

Kara McDonagh
Program Manager
Programmatic, Training and Technical Assistance Contact
202-305-1456
kara.mcdonagh@usdoj.gov

Kerri Strug
Program Manager
Programmatic, Training and Technical Assistance Contact
202-598-7956
kerri.strug@usdoj.gov

Marilyn Zimmerman
Senior Tribal Policy Advisor
Programmatic Contact
202-616-1709
marilyn.zimmerman@usdoj.gov

Training and Technical Assistance Contact(s)
Indian Country Child Trauma Center
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
940 NE 13th St., Nicholson Tower, 4N, 4900
Oklahoma City, OK 73104
405-271-8001
http://www.icctc.org/
The Resource Basket
RurAL CAP Office
731 East 8th Ave.
Anchorage, AK 99501
800-478-7227
907-278-2309 (fax)
http://resourcebasket.org/
ResourcesTop  
OJJDP Publication(s)
Attorney General's Advisory Committee on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence: Ending Violence So Children Can Thrive
November 2014. This report presents the Attorney General's Advisory Committee policy recommendations on the current epidemic of violence and evaluated suggestions for preventing violence and alleviating its impact on American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children. 258 pages. NCJ 248500.
Abstract
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OJJDP News @ a Glance, July/August 2015
OJJDP-Produced, September 2015. The top story highlights the recent White House Tribal Youth Gathering, while Administrator Robert L. Listenbee's video message discusses OJJDP's efforts to encourage and learn from youth voices. Other features show how OJJDP is helping to rethink school discipline; encourage children to stand against violence; train youth leaders of the juvenile justice system; and more. NCJ 249004.
Abstract
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OJJDP's Major Grant Programs
Fact Sheet, October 2011. This fact sheet discusses OJJDP's grant programs, which are authorized by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended. 4 pages. NCJ 234072.
Abstract
PDF 
OJJDP's Program of Research for Tribal Youth
April 2001. This fact sheet summarizes OJJDP's tribal youth research activities, under the Tribal Youth Program (TYP), which are designed to provide empirical evidence about juvenile justice and delinquency prevention policies and practices and their impact on tribal youth. 2 pages. NCJ 187530.
Abstract
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Link(s)

Department of Justice: Tribal Justice and Safetynew
The Department of Justice launched the Tribal Justice and Safety initiative in June 2009 to increase engagement, coordination and action on public safety in tribal communities.

Department of Justice: Defending Childhoodnew
The Department of Justice's Defending Childhood initiative launched in September 2010 to address a national crisis: the exposure of America’s children to violence as victims and as witnesses.