U.S. Department of Justice, Office Of Justice Programs, Innovation - Partnerships - Safer Neighborhoods
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Working for Youth Justice and Safety
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    Frequently Asked Questions


Have a question? Check here for answers to frequently asked questions under the following topics: OJJDP Basics, Resources, Funding, and Juvenile Justice.

OJJDP Basics

  • What is OJJDP's mission?
  • When was OJJDP founded?
  • How do I contact OJJDP staff?

  • What is OJJDP's mission?

    OJJDP provides national leadership, coordination, and resources to prevent and respond to juvenile delinquency and victimization. OJJDP supports states and communities in their efforts to develop and implement effective and coordinated prevention and intervention programs and to improve the juvenile justice system so that it protects public safety, holds offenders accountable, and provides treatment and rehabilitative services tailored to the needs of juveniles and their families.

  • When was OJJDP founded?

    OJJDP was founded in 1974 as a result of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act of 1974 (Pub. L. No. 93-415, 42 U.S.C. 5601 et seq.) and is guided by subsequent amendments. Visit the About OJJDP section of this site for additional information.

  • How do I contact OJJDP staff?

    Visit the staff directory.

Resources

Funding

  • How do I apply for a grant?
  • How does the funding process work?
  • What is peer review, and how do I become a peer reviewer?

  • How do I apply for a grant?

    Apply online using the Office of Justice Program's (OJP's) Grants Management System (GMS). GMS facilitates the submission, tracking, and announcement of grants. It also enables you to check the status of your application. If you don't have Internet access, OJP encourages you to use computer terminals provided by public libraries, copy centers, and similar businesses.

  • How does the funding process work?

    OJJDP provides funding through formula and block grants and discretionary grants. Funding through formula grants and block grants is available to states and territories; Juvenile Justice Specialists in each state then administer the funding through subgrants to localities. Funding through discretionary grants is available to states, units of local government, and private organizations through a competitive peer review process. For more information on the funding process, visit the Funding section of this Web site.

  • What is peer review, and how do I become a peer reviewer?

    OJJDP uses a formal peer review process to evaluate grant applications. Eligible applications are reviewed and discussed by a panel of outside experts in fields related to the subject matter of the program, with the exception of assistance provided pursuant to Section 241(f) of the Act to an eligible organization comprised of member representatives of the State Advisory Groups.

    The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) invites researchers and practitioners with expertise related to juvenile justice to apply to serve as peer reviewers for its competitive grant applications. Applicants should indicate their juvenile justice-related knowledge and experience, including: gangs, mentoring, girls' delinquency, children's exposure to violence, substance abuse, tribal juvenile justice, Internet crimes against children, and more.

    To apply, e-mail a current résumé or curriculum vitae to OJJDPConsultantPool@usdoj.gov. Write "Peer Reviewer Candidate" in the subject line. OJJDP will compensate peer reviewers for their time and effort.

Juvenile Justice