Tribal Youth Program

Purpose

The Tribal Youth Program (TYP) supports and enhances tribal efforts to prevent and control delinquency and improve the juvenile justice system for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth.

Authority

OJJDP anticipates that $10 million will be available for OJJDP to support and enhance tribal efforts to prevent and control delinquency and improve the juvenile justice system for AI/AN youth. Of the $10 million appropriated for TYP, OJJDP will use 10% of appropriated funds to support program-related research, evaluation, and statistics; 2% to provide training and technical assistance to tribal programs; and $8 million for discretionary grants, of which $1 million will be available to fund discretionary programs to support the TYP Mental Health Initiative. Remaining funds will be used to enhance other tribal efforts and for program support.

Background

TYP is part of the Indian Country Law Enforcement Initiative, a joint initiative of the U.S. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and the Interior to improve law enforcement and the administration of criminal and juvenile justice in Indian country. Many of the 1.9 million American Indians living on or near Indian lands lack sufficient law enforcement services. Indian communities face chronic underfunding for their justice systems, lack access to meaningful training for law enforcement and justice personnel, and lack comprehensive programs that focus on preventing juvenile delinquency, providing intervention services, and imposing appropriate sanctions.

Although violent crime arrest rates have declined throughout the United States, they continue to rise in Indian country. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics' Special Report Violent Victimization and Race, 1993–98 (Rennison, 2001), American Indians experience violent crime at a rate twice that of the general population. Of particular concern to tribes and the federal government, especially OJJDP, is the increasing number of violent crimes committed by and against juveniles in Indian country. Thus, the Indian Country Law Enforcement Initiative and OJJDP seek to address these problems by enhancing law enforcement in Indian country and improving the quality of life in tribal communities. Since fiscal year (FY) 1999, OJJDP has awarded 203 grants to tribes throughout the nation to develop and implement culturally sensitive delinquency prevention programs, alcohol and substance abuse prevention programs, interventions for court-involved youth, and improvements to the juvenile justice system. Among the 203 grants are mental health grants awarded to 254 tribes. Beginning in FY 2003, OJJDP started to award cooperative agreements to federally recognized tribes.

Goal

TYP funding is provided to help tribes improve the quality of life in AI/AN communities by addressing the problem of crimes committed by and against AI/AN youth.

Eligibility Requirements

Applications are invited from federally recognized tribes. Tribal partnerships are encouraged to apply, when appropriate. If two or more tribes are applying as a partnership, one tribe must be clearly identified as the "primary agency" for purposes of correspondence, awards, and management. When applying as a partnership, applicants must identify a total service population in the Project Abstract section of the application.

Note: Although tribes may contract for services with other organizations, only federally recognized tribes whose names appear in volume 68, number 234 of the Federal Register (pp. 68179–68184) (see Appendix C) are eligible to receive a cooperative agreement award. Only federally recognized tribes who do not have an active TYP or Mental Health grant from OJJDP are eligible to apply.

Restriction for Certain Tribes

Applicants are advised that funds awarded through this program to the tribes listed below may not be used for courts or law enforcement officers for a tribe or village, pursuant to Pub. L. No. 108-199, sec. 112(a)(1). The following tribes are subject to the above restriction on use of funds: (1) tribes in which fewer than 25 Native members live in the village year round; and (2) tribes that are located within the boundaries of the Fairbanks North Star Borough, the Matanuska Susitna Borough, the Municipality of Anchorage, the Kenai Peninsula Borough, the City and Borough of Juneau, the Sitka Borough, and the Ketchikan Borough.

Faith-Based and Community Organizations

It is the Office of Justice Program's (OJP's) policy that faith-based and community organizations that statutorily qualify as eligible applicants under OJP programs are invited and encouraged to apply for assistance awards. Faith-based and community organizations will be considered for an award on the same basis as any other eligible applicants and, if they receive awards, will be treated on an equal basis with non-faith-based and community organization grantees in the administration of such awards. No eligible applicant or grantee will be discriminated against on the basis of its religious character or affiliation, religious name, or the religious composition of its board of directors or persons working in the organization.

Tribal Resolution and Memorandum of Understanding

Before an applicant receives a cooperative agreement award, the applicant will be required to submit a signed copy of the tribal resolution to OJJDP. The application will not be awarded if a signed tribal resolution is not submitted upon request.

If applying as a partnership with other federally recognized tribes, the applicant will be required to submit a signed Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that includes an outline of each partner's roles and responsibilities. Before an applicant receives a cooperative agreement award, the applicant will be required to submit a signed MOU. Failure to submit the document upon request will eliminate the applicant from consideration.

Program Requirements

Those applying for funding must clearly identify no more than two of the following categories in the Project Abstract as the focus of their application for funding:

  • Provide prevention services to impact risk factors for delinquency. Prevention services include risk factor identification, antigang education, youth gun violence reduction programs, truancy prevention programs, school dropout prevention programs, afterschool programs, and/or parenting education programs.

  • Provide interventions for court-involved tribal youth. Intervention services include graduated sanctions, restitution, diversion, home detention, foster and shelter care, and/or mentoring.

  • Improve the tribal juvenile justice system. Juvenile justice improvement includes the development and implementation of indigenous justice strategies, tribal juvenile codes, tribal youth courts, intake assessments, advocacy programs, and gender-specific programming and the enhancement of juvenile probation services and/or reentry programs.

  • Provide alcohol and drug abuse prevention programs. Alcohol and drug abuse prevention services include drug and/or alcohol education, drug testing, and screening. In addition, applicants must identify how they will collect data for the performance measurement requirement.

Reporting Requirements

Recipients of TYP cooperative agreements will be required to submit quarterly Financial Status Reports and semiannual Categorical Progress Reports that describe program implementation. In addition, cooperative agreement recipients who expend $500,000 or more of federal funds from any source during their fiscal year are required to submit a single organizationwide audit. Additional information on these reporting requirements will be provided to successful applicants in the award package.

Grants Versus Cooperative Agreements

Cooperative agreements are used when substantial collaboration is anticipated between OJJDP and the award recipient during performance of the proposed activities.

Responsibility for general oversight and redirection of the project, if necessary, rests with OJJDP. OJJDP will review and approve all activities in the requirements under the various stages, as enumerated in the solicitation. This includes review and approval in a timely manner of all key personnel selections, consultants, assessments, plans, instruments, manuals, and documents developed or identified for use during the project, with suggestions for modifications. Responsibility for the coordination of topics addressed or services rendered will be shared by OJJDP and the recipient. Where appropriate, the recipient will act jointly with OJJDP to determine modifications to the program plan or budget and to design data collection instruments. In executing this responsibility, OJJDP requires that a program specialist meet periodically with the recipient (as determined by OJJDP) throughout the life of the project to discuss project activities, plans, problems, and solutions. Responsibility for the day-to-day conduct of the project rests with the recipient. This specifically includes operations, data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

Training and Technical Assistance

Recipients of TYP cooperative agreements will receive training and technical assistance (T/TA) to facilitate program planning, program enhancement, evaluation, and implementation of TYP. The current T/TA provider for TYP is the Native American Alliance Foundation, which is based in Albuquerque, NM. Further information on T/TA will be provided to grantees after awards have been made.

Application Procedures

OJP requires that applications be submitted through its online Grants Management System (GMS). Access to this online application system will streamline the processing of requests for funding.

To learn how to begin the online application process, please see the Step-by-Step Guide. A toll-free telephone number (888–549–9901) has been established to provide applicants with technical assistance as they work through the online application process.

Application Peer Review/Selection Criteria

Tribes are encouraged to design culturally based programs and to incorporate traditional practices, when appropriate. The roles of children, parents, and elders in individual tribal communities should be considered in the program design. Applicants should describe proposed activities and explain them in the context of the juvenile delinquency prevention, intervention, and system improvement activities. OJJDP encourages applicants to involve tribal youth in the planning and implementation of program activities. Because all tribes are unique, OJJDP recognizes that applications will vary based on the approach, needs, and regional perspective of each applicant.

OJJDP is committed to ensuring a competitive and standardized process for awarding cooperative agreements. Applications will be screened initially to determine whether the applicant meets all the eligibility requirements as noted above and application requirements as noted below. Only applications submitted by eligible applicants and that meet all other requirements will be evaluated, scored, and rated by a peer review panel according to the selection criteria described under Application Requirements (see below). All applications that proceed to peer review will be rated on a 100-point scale. Point values for individual elements of the application are presented below with the description of each element. Note: Elements that are not given point values are still required.

Peer reviewers' ratings and any resulting recommendations are advisory only. All final cooperative agreement award decisions will be made by the U.S. Department of Justice, which may also give consideration to geographic distribution and regional balance when making awards. Detailed information about OJJDP's peer review process can be found in the Funding section of OJJDP's Web site (www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ojjdp).

Application Requirements

Applicants must submit the following information online through GMS:

  • DUNS Number.

  • GMS Registration.

  • Application for Federal Assistance (SF-424).

  • Assurances and Certifications.

  • Budget Detail Worksheet (Attachment #1). The Budget Detail Worksheet—including budget worksheets and budget narratives for each year of the 3-year project period—accounts for 15 of the possible 100 points allotted by the peer reviewers.

  • Program Narrative (Attachment #2). The Program Narrative—including Project Abstract, Problem(s) To Be Addressed, Goals and Objectives, Project Design, and Management and Organizational Capability—accounts for 85 out of the possible 100 points allotted by the peer reviewers. Point values for specific sections of the Program Narrative are as follows: Problem(s) To Be Addressed (15 points), Goals and Objectives (20 points), Project Design (30 points), Management and Organizational Capability (20 points). Although not assigned a point value, the Project Abstract is required. See format requirements.

  • Other Program Attachments (Attachment #3). Other Program Attachments—including résumés of key personnel and the project timeline—will not be included in the peer reviewers' scoring of the application. However, these materials are required, must be attached in one file to your GMS application, and will be used by peer reviewers when evaluating the Project Design and Management and Organizational Capability sections of the Program Narrative.

Detailed instructions and descriptions of each of the required application elements are provided below. Applications that do not include all the required elements will not be considered for funding.

Note: Files attached to applications submitted online in GMS must be in the following formats: Microsoft Word (.doc), PDF files (.pdf), or text documents (.txt).

An Application Checklist has been provided for your convenience.

Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System

Beginning October 1, 2003, a Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number must be included in every application for a new award or renewal of an award. An application will not be considered complete until a valid DUNS number is provided by the applicant. Individuals who would personally receive a grant or cooperative agreement from the federal government are exempt from this requirement.

Organizations should verify that they have a DUNS number or take the steps necessary to obtain one as soon as possible. Applicants can receive a DUNS number at no cost by calling the dedicated toll-free DUNS Number request line at 800–333–0505.

GMS Registration

Applicants must register for this solicitation by selecting "Tribal Youth Program" from the Funding Opportunities page in GMS. To register, applicants must select "Apply Now," read the warning message that appears, and select "Continue." The deadline for applicants to register on GMS is 8:00 p.m. ET, May 27, 2004.

Application for Federal Assistance (SF-424)

Applicants must complete the Overview, Applicant Information, and Project Information sections of GMS. These sections provide the information needed to generate the Application for Federal Assistance (SF-424), a standard form used by most federal agencies.

Assurances and Certifications

Applicants are required to review and accept the Assurances and Certifications. Please verify that the name, address, phone number, fax number, and e-mail address of the authorizing official on these online forms are correct.

Assurances

The applicant must comply with Assurances in order to receive federal funds under this program. It is the responsibility of the recipient of the federal funds to fully understand and comply with these requirements. Failure to comply may result in the withholding of funds, termination of the award, or other sanctions.

Certifications Regarding Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters; and the Drug-Free Workplace Requirement

Applicants are required to review and check off the box on the certification form included in the online application process. This form commits the applicant to compliance with the certification requirements under 28 CFR Part 69, "New Restrictions on Lobbying," and 28 CFR Part 67, "A Government-Wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) and Government-Wide Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Grants)."

Applicants should be aware that the Anti-Lobbying Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1913, recently was amended to expand significantly the restriction on use of appropriated funding for lobbying. This expansion also makes the anti-lobbying restrictions enforceable via large civil penalties, with civil fines between $10,000 and $100,000 per each individual occurrence of lobbying activity. These restrictions are in addition to the anti-lobbying and lobbying disclosure restrictions imposed by 31 U.S.C. § 1352. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is currently in the process of amending the OMB cost circulars and the common rule (codified at 28 CFR part 69 for DOJ grantees) to reflect these modifications. However, in the interest of full disclosure, all applicants must understand that no federally appropriated funding made available under this cooperative agreement program may be used, either directly or indirectly, to support the enactment, repeal, modification or adoption of any law, regulation, or policy, at any level of government, without the express approval by OJP. Any violation of this prohibition is subject to a minimum $10,000 fine for each occurrence. This prohibition applies to all activity, even if currently allowed within the parameters of the existing OMB circulars.

The authorizing official must review the Assurances and Certifications forms in their entirety. To accept the Assurances and Certifications in GMS, click on the Assurances and Certifications link and click the "Accept" button at the bottom of the screen.

Budget Detail Worksheet (Attachment #1) (15 points)

Applicants must provide a budget that (1) is complete, allowable, and cost effective in relation to the proposed activities; (2) shows the cost calculations demonstrating how the applicant arrived at the total amount requested; and (3) provides a brief supporting narrative to link costs with project activities. The budget cannot exceed the Award Amount and Award Period.

  • Budget Worksheet. The budget worksheet must list the cost of each budget item and show how the cost was calculated. For example, costs for personnel should show the annual salary rate and the percentage of time devoted to the project for each employee to be paid through the cooperative agreement funds. The budget worksheet should present a complete and detailed itemization of all proposed costs.

  • Budget Narrative. The budget narrative should closely follow the content of the budget worksheet and provide justification for all proposed costs. For example, the narrative should explain how fringe benefits were calculated (include percent for each benefit), how travel costs were estimated, why particular items of equipment or supplies must be purchased and their relevance to the delinquency prevention or delinquency control goals of the program, and how overhead or indirect costs (if applicable) were calculated. The budget narrative should justify the specific items listed in the budget worksheet (particularly supplies, travel, and equipment) and demonstrate that all costs are reasonable.

Note: Total costs specified in the complete budget must match the amount provided in the Estimated Funding section of the Project Information screen in GMS. All funds listed in the budget will be subject to audit.

A sample budget can be found in appendix A. As with the Program Narrative and Other Program Attachments, the Budget Detail Worksheet file must be submitted in an approved format (Microsoft Word document, PDF file, or text document).

Budget Requirements

All project expenditures must be reasonable and support the objectives of TYP. The applicant must explain how funded activities address at least one and no more than two of the following categories: (1) provide prevention services to impact risk factors for delinquency, (2) provide interventions for court-involved tribal youth, (3) improve the tribal juvenile justice system, and (4) provide alcohol and drug abuse prevention programs.

  • The applicant must provide a detailed budget worksheet that includes a budget narrative, including the basis for the computation of all costs, for each year of the 3-year project period. For example, if an applicant is requesting $300,000 in funding, approximately $100,000 should be allocated for each of the 3 years.

  • Budgets must include travel costs for up to two persons to attend a mandatory, one-time, OJJDP-sponsored national TYP orientation meeting in year 1. This meeting will be held in Washington, DC.

  • Budgets must include travel costs for up to two persons to attend three (one per year) OJJDP-sponsored TYP regional cluster meetings (locations to be determined).

  • Budgets must include the purchase of one computer system with Internet access and e-mail capability to be dedicated to TYP operations, if one is not already available. Applicants must specify that they already have access to a computer with Internet access and e-mail capability in the application if funding for a computer system is not included in the budget request.

  • If the applicant has identified an indirect cost as part of the budget, OJJDP will require the official indirect cost agreement letter to be submitted before a cooperative agreement will be awarded. Applicants failing to submit the required indirect cost agreement will not be funded.

Construction Costs

Construction costs are prohibited under this cooperative agreement. However, construction costs incurred as an incidental and a necessary part of a program and limited to renovations, remodeling, maintenance, and repairs that do not constitute capital expenditures will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Such costs may not exceed 10 percent of the project's total costs.

Match

This funding opportunity does not have a match requirement.

Program Narrative (Attachment #2) (Total: 85 points)

In developing the Program Narrative section of the application, which is limited to 25 double-spaced pages, applicants must provide a comprehensive proposal describing how they plan to achieve the goals and objectives of the Tribal Youth Program as outlined in this program announcement.

Project Abstract

Applications must include a one-page project abstract that provides the following information:

  • The category(ies) under which the applicant is applying (see Program Requirements).

  • Identification as a federally recognized tribe. (The applicant's tribe name must appear in volume 68, number 234 of the Federal Register (pp. 68179-68184) (see Appendix C).

  • Age(s) of juveniles served by the project.

  • Number of juveniles (age 17 and younger) to be served by the project.

  • Location of the project (name of reservation/state).

  • Type of setting (e.g., school, detention center, recreation program).

  • Statement of support by the federally recognized tribe indicating whether a resolution supporting this application has been passed. If a tribal resolution has not been passed, indicate the date such approval will be forthcoming.

    Note: OJJDP requests a signed tribal resolution before an applicant receives an award. Funds will not be awarded if a signed resolution is not submitted upon request.

  • Type of project (e.g., prevention, afterschool, school-based, court-involved youth, year-round, mental health, substance abuse). A brief narrative should describe how the planned activities will address up to two categories (see Program Requirements).

Problem(s) To Be Addressed (15 points)

The applicant must discuss the types and the number of incidents of juvenile delinquency in the geographic area to be served by the proposed project. The discussion must include—

  • A clear statement describing the problem(s) addressed by the proposed project. (Include any relevant information that will support your description of the problem, such as truancy and dropout rates, delinquency rates, and poverty and education levels.)

  • The specific age range targeted by the proposed project.

  • The number of juveniles served by the proposed project.

  • A description of the geographic area (e.g., reservation, pueblo, rancheria, village) served by the proposed project.

Goals and Objectives (20 points)

The goal (i.e., the statement of what the applicant wishes to achieve) and objectives (i.e., the steps the applicant will take toward meeting the goal) of the proposed project should be clearly defined, and the outcomes should be measurable. There are two kinds of objectives: performance objectives and outcome objectives. Both are necessary for a good program design. Both must be measurable and must have specific deadlines for completion. The following are brief definitions and examples of performance and outcome measures:

  • Performance objectives define the essential parts of the implementation process. For example, "Hire TYP Coordinator to expand afterschool activities for 50 at-risk youth from July 1, 2004, to July 1, 2005.

  • Outcome objectives define the results to be achieved. They describe the change(s) demonstrated by participant groups. For example, "To reduce juvenile arrest rates by 10 percent from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2007."

Applicants must include both performance and outcome objectives for their projects.

Project Design (30 points)

This section of the Program Narrative should outline a project design that is sound and contains activities directly linked to the achievement of the project's objectives. The activities being proposed must be explained in the context of juvenile delinquency prevention, intervention, and/or system improvement (depending on which of the four possible categories the applicant has selected). Applicants should describe how they will identify the AI/AN youth to be served/treated. This section should describe in detail the "who," "what," "where," "when," and "how" of the project. The project design should also include a description of any current federal and/or nonprofit programs or services that will collaborate with the proposed TYP project.

Timeline. The application must include a timeline that indicates when specific tasks will be initiated and completed throughout the project period-from October 1, 2004, to September 30, 2007. The applicant must refer to the timeline, as appropriate, in the narrative and include it in Attachment #3 of the application. (See the sample timeline in appendix B.)

Evaluation. Applicants must include a detailed plan for evaluating the proposed project, demonstrating how both performance and outcome objectives will be measured. This plan must identify the source of the data to be used in measuring the achievement of the objectives. Responsibility for data collection and analysis should be clearly stated in the plan. Applicants who need technical assistance with any part of the program design will have the opportunity to request assistance after awards have been made.

Note: The evaluation must collect data in support of the performance measurement.

OJJDP is in the process of developing a national TYP evaluation. Applicants selected for funding under the TYP Initiative should be prepared to cooperate in the national evaluation. Technical assistance will be provided, if needed.

Management and Organizational Capability (20 points)

Project management and overall organizational capability demonstrate the applicant's ability to operate and support the project successfully. The application must describe the positions to be funded and qualifications that will be required of those to be hired. Applicants must ensure that the tasks delineated in the project timeline (see"Project Design"above) are adequately staffed. Résumés and/or position descriptions must be included in Attachment #3 for individuals who will hold key positions. Applications must provide for fiscal control and accounting procedures that ensure the prudent use and proper disbursement and accounting of project funds.

Tribal Resolution. A written statement must be provided to OJJDP that indicates whether a tribal resolution supporting the application has been passed. If a tribal resolution has not been passed, applicants must state when such approval will occur.

Nonsupplanting Requirement. A written statement must be provided to OJJDP stating that federal funds will not be used to supplant state, local, or tribal funds. Federal funds must be used to supplement existing funds for program activities and not replace those funds that have been appropriated for the same purpose. Potential supplanting will be the subject of application review, as well as preaward review, postaward monitoring, and audit. If there is a potential presence of supplanting, the applicant or grantee will be required to supply documentation demonstrating that the reduction in nonfederal resources occurred for reasons other than the receipt or expected receipt of federal funds.

Applicants must demonstrate organizational capacity and the existence of a management structure that will support the achievement of the proposed project's goal and objectives in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Applicants should include a description of any similar programs and services they have provided previously.

Format

The Program Narrative (including all required sections) must be double-spaced using a standard 12-point font and 1-inch margins on all sides. Please limit the use of acronyms. If used, acronyms must be spelled out when first referenced. The Program Narrative must not exceed 25 pages (please number pages 1 of 25, 2 of 25, etc.). This 25-page limit includes any charts, tables, or figures. As with the Budget Detail Worksheet and Other Program Attachments, the Program Narrative file must be submitted in an approved format (Microsoft Word document, PDF file, or text document).

Other Program Attachments (Attachment #3)

Attachment #3 provides documents that supplement and support the Project Design and Management and Organizational Capability sections of the Program Narrative and attest that the applicant complies with DOJ's Coordination of Federal Efforts requirements.

Applicants must provide the following materials in a single file as an attachment to their GMS applications. As with the Budget Detail Worksheet and Program Narrative attachments, the Other Program Attachments file must be submitted in an approved format (Microsoft Word document, PDF file, or text document).

Please provide the following items in the order presented here and using the headings as indicated, starting each section on a new page. In other words, the Other Program Attachments will be one file with three sections, with each section beginning on a new page. The sections are:

  • Résumés of key personnel. Résumés and/or position descriptions must be provided for individuals who will hold key positions.

  • Timeline. The timeline must indicate when specific tasks will be initiated and completed throughout the 3-year cooperative agreement period (October 1, 2004, to September 30, 2007).

  • Coordination of Federal Efforts. To encourage better coordination among federal agencies in addressing state and tribal needs, DOJ is requesting applicants to provide information on the following:

    • Active federal grant award(s) supporting this or related efforts, including awards from DOJ.

    • Any pending application(s) for federal funds for this or related efforts.

    • Plans for coordinating any funds described in the previous two items with the funding sought by this application.

    For each federal award, applicants must identify the program or project title, the federal granting agency, and the amount of the award and must provide a brief description of the purpose of the award. The term "related efforts" is defined as one of the following:

    • Efforts for the same purpose (i.e., the proposed award would supplement, expand, complement, or continue activities funded with other federal grants).

    • Another phase or component of the same program or project (e.g., the applicant's proposed program/services implement a planning effort funded by other federal funds or provide a substance abuse treatment or education component within a criminal justice project funded by other federal funds).

    • Services of some kind (e.g., technical assistance, research, or evaluation) that are related to the project described in the application.

    Note: The résumés, timeline, and information regarding the coordination of federal efforts must be attached to your GMS application in one file.

Administrative Requirements

Performance Measurement

The Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) (Pub. L. No. 103-62) requires that recipients of federal awards collect, analyze, and report data that measure the results of strategies implemented with federal funds. To ensure compliance with GPRA, grantees will be required to collect and report data that measure the results of the program implemented with this cooperative agreement.

To assist in determining program performance, award recipients will be required to collect and report on the following performance data prior to project implementation, semiannually during the project period, and at the end of the project period:

  • Number of youth receiving services.

  • Number of youth self-reporting alcohol and drug use (the applicant must identify a data collection instrument).

  • Number and percentage of youth screened for risk factors.

Award recipients will be required to collect and report data in support of these measures. Recipients' assistance in obtaining this information will facilitate future program planning and will allow OJP to provide Congress with measurable program results of federally funded programs.

Single Point of Contact Review

Executive Order 12372 requires applicants from state and local units of government or other organizations providing services within a state to submit a copy of the application to the state Single Point of Contact (SPOC) if one exists and if this program has been selected for review by the state. A list of state SPOCs is available on OMB's Web site (www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/spoc.html). Applicants must contact their state SPOCs to determine whether their programs have been selected for state review. The date that the application was sent to the SPOC or the reason such submission is not required should be entered in Block 3 of the Overview section of the GMS application.

Coordination of Federal Efforts

To encourage better coordination among federal agencies in addressing state and local needs, DOJ requests that applicants provide information on the following: (1) active federal grant award(s) supporting this or related efforts, including awards from DOJ; (2) any pending application(s) for federal funds for this or related efforts; and (3) plans for coordinating any funds described in items (1) or (2) with the funding sought by this application. For each federal award, applicants must include the program or project title, the federal grantor agency, the amount of the award, and a brief description of its purpose. "Related efforts" is defined for these purposes as one of the following:

  • Efforts for the same purpose (i.e., the proposed award would supplement, expand, complement, or continue activities funded with other federal grants or cooperative agreements).

  • Another phase or component of the same program or project (e.g., to implement a planning effort funded by other federal funds or to provide a substance abuse treatment or education component within a criminal justice project).

  • Services of some kind (e.g., technical assistance, research, or evaluation) rendered to the program or project described in the application.

Civil Rights Compliance

All recipients of federal funds are required to comply with nondiscrimination requirements contained in various federal laws. In the event that a court or administrative agency makes a finding of discrimination on grounds of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, disability, or age against a recipient of funds after a due process hearing, the recipient must agree to forward a copy of the finding to the Office of Civil Rights, OJP. All applicants should consult the Assurances required to be submitted with the application to understand the applicable legal and administrative requirements.

National origin discrimination includes discrimination on the basis of limited English proficiency (LEP). To ensure compliance with Title VI and the Safe Streets Act, recipients are required to take reasonable steps to ensure that LEP persons have meaningful access to their programs. Meaningful access may entail providing language assistance services, including oral and written translation when necessary. DOJ has issued guidance for grantees to assist them in complying with Title VI requirements. The guidance document can be accessed on the Internet at www.lep.gov, or by contacting OJP's Office for Civil Rights at 202–307–0690, or by writing to the following address:

Office for Civil Rights
Office of Justice Programs
U.S. Department of Justice
810 7th Street NW., 8th Floor
Washington, DC 20531

Privacy Certificate Requirements

Applicants should be aware of DOJ's requirements for privacy and confidentiality in research and statistical efforts. These requirements are stipulated by 42 U.S.C. § 3879g. DOJ has issued a specific regulation concerning the implementation of this statutory requirement in 28 CFR Part 22. In accordance with 28 CFR Part 22, applicants requesting funds for research or statistical activities must submit a Privacy Certificate with the application. The purpose of the Privacy Certificate is to ensure that the applicant has appropriate policies and procedures in place to protect the confidentiality of data identifiable to private persons. Specifically, the Privacy Certificate must be in compliance with the requirements of 28 CFR § 22.23. OJJDP has developed guidelines for preparing a Privacy Certificate in accordance with the confidentiality regulation. Copies of the Privacy Certificate Guidelines, a Privacy Certificate Face Sheet, and a Sample Attachment for a Privacy Certificate are available on the OJJDP Web site at ojjdp.ncjrs.org/funding/privacy.pdf.

Applicants are further advised that any project that will involve the use of human research subjects must be reviewed by an institutional review board (IRB), in accordance with DOJ regulations at 28 CFR Part 46. IRB review is not required prior to submission of the application. However, if an award is made and the project involves research using human subjects, OJJDP will place a special condition on the award requiring that the project be approved by an appropriate IRB before federal funds can be disbursed. Applicants should include plans for IRB review, where applicable, in the project timeline submitted with the proposal. A copy of "Confidentiality of Identifiable Research and Statistical Information (28 CFR Part 22)" is available on the OJJDP Web site at ojjdp.ncjrs.org/funding/confidentiality.pdf.

Financial Requirements

Discretionary grants and cooperative agreements are governed by the provisions of OMB circulars applicable to financial assistance and OJP's Financial Guide, which is available on OJP's Web site (www.ojp.usdoj.gov/oc). The Guide includes information on allowable costs, methods of payment, audit requirements, accounting systems, and financial records. This document will govern the administration of funds by all successful applicants.

Government Audit Requirements

Audits of state and local units of government, institutions of higher education, and other nonprofit institutions must comply with the organizational audit requirements of OMB circular A-133, which states that recipients who expend $500,000 or more of federal funds during the fiscal year are required to submit to their cognizant federal agency an organizationwide financial and compliance audit report within 9 months after the close of each fiscal year during the term of the award.

Grantees must comply with the following OJP reporting requirements:

  • Financial Status Reports (SF-269). Financial Status Reports should be completed and provided to the Office of the Comptroller's Control Desk within 45 days after the end of each calendar quarter during the project period.

  • Categorical Assistance Progress Reports (OJP Form 4587/1). Categorical Assistance Progress Reports should be completed and provided to the Office of the Comptroller's Control Desk within 30 days after the end of the June 30 and December 31 semiannual period during the project period.

Suspension or Termination of Funding

OJJDP may suspend funding in whole or in part, terminate funding, or impose other sanctions on a recipient for the following reasons:

  • Failing to comply substantially with the requirements or statutory objectives of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, program guidelines issued thereunder, or other provisions of federal law.

  • Failing to make satisfactory progress toward the goals, objectives, or strategies set forth in the application.

  • Failing to adhere to the requirements in the agreement, standard conditions, or special conditions.

  • Proposing or implementing substantial plan changes to the extent that, if originally submitted, the application would not have been selected for funding.

  • Failing to submit reports.

  • Filing a false certification in this application or other report or document.

Before imposing sanctions, OJJDP will provide reasonable notice to the recipient of its intent to impose sanctions and will attempt to resolve the problem informally. Hearing and appeal procedures will follow those in DOJ regulations in 28 CFR Part 18.

Award Amount

Awards will be made only to federally recognized tribes through cooperative agreements not to exceed $300,000 for a 3-year budget and project period.

Award Period

This project will be funded for a 3-year project and budget period.

Due Date

All online applications must completed by 8:00 p.m. ET, June 1, 2004.

Contact

For further information, contact:

Laura Ansera, Program Manager
Tribal Youth Program
Demonstration Programs Division
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
810 Seventh Street NW.
Washington, DC 20531
202–307–5911
anseral@ojp.usdoj.gov

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FY 2004 Tribal Youth Program, Program Announcement OJJDP, June 2004