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Juvenile Justice Reform Initiatives in the States

Acknowledgements

This report, Juvenile Justice Reform Initiatives in the States: 1994-1996, reflects the skill and diligent work of the National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA) staff; the numerous Federal and State officials who contributed generously of their time to help expedite this project; and other organizations that shared their contributions to the field of State juvenile justice policy for compilation in this report.

The project staff is grateful to U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) Administrator Shay Bilchik for his review and continued guidance on the report. OJJDP Deputy Administrator John Wilson and Project Monitor Eileen Garry also provided valuable advice and insight through their review of the report during various stages of its development. Further, Nolan Jones, director of the Human Resources Group of the National Governors' Association (NGA), also provided insight and commentary on the report.

The NCJA project staff would also like to extend a special thanks to former NCJA Executive Vice President Gwen A. Holden, who was instrumental in the development of the project and went beyond the call of duty to contribute to its substance after she had completed her 21-year tenure with NCJA.

The project staff are also appreciative of the time given generously by State officials in Colorado, Connecticut, Ohio, and Oregon during the case study interviews. The following individuals were instrumental in the information they provided and the insight they offered concerning the status of comprehensive juvenile code reform in their States: William R. Woodward, director of criminal justice planning, Colorado Department of Public Safety; Pat Cervera, juvenile justice specialist, Office of Juvenile Justice, Colorado Department of Public Safety; Joe Thome, program administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice, Colorado Department of Public Safety; Thomas A. Siconolfi, director of policy development and planning division, Connecticut Office of Policy and Management; William H. Carbone, director of the Office of Alternative Sanctions, Connecticut Judicial Department; Michael L. Lee, director of the Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services; Julie Reuetner, legislative affairs and communications, Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services; Linda Modry, administrator, Ohio Department of Youth Services; Carol Rapp Zimmermann, assistant director, Ohio Department of Youth Services; Linda Lewis-Day, administrator, Ohio Family and Children First; L. Craig Campbell, former special assistant attorney general of the State of Oregon and coordinator of the Governor's Juvenile Justice Task Force; and Greg Peden, director of criminal justice services, Oregon State Police.

The chapter on juvenile justice reform initiatives in the States could not have been completed without the contributions and hard work of other organizations that provided information concerning State-level juvenile justice policies. Those organizations to which NCJA is indebted are the American Prosecutors Research Institute, the Campaign for an Effective Crime Policy, the Institute for Law and Justice, the Institute for Intergovernmental Research, the National Center for Juvenile Justice, and the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Finally, NCJA would like to acknowledge the work of the following staff members and interns: Paul E. Lawrence, director of administration and information systems; Lisa Doyle Moran, associate director for legal affairs; Robert A. Kapler, senior staff associate; Michelle M. Vannemann, staff attorney; Elizabeth A. Pearson, staff associate; Paula Bresnan Gibson, legal researcher; and Alan Burchardt, intern.


Cabell C. Cropper
Executive Director
National Criminal Justice Association


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